Cloud Computing is the use of hardware and software to deliver a service over a network (typically the Internet). With cloud computing, users can access files and use applications from any device that can access the Internet.

The “cloud” is a set of different types of hardware and software that work collectively to deliver many aspects of computing to the end-user as an online service.

Cloud computing means that instead of all the computer hardware and software you’re using sitting on your desktop, or somewhere inside your company’s network, it’s provided for you as a service by another company and accessed over the Internet, usually in a completely seamless way. Exactly where the hardware and software is located and how it all works doesn’t matter to you, the user—it’s just somewhere up in the nebulous “cloud” that the Internet represents.

Cloud computing is a buzzword that means different things to different people. For some, it’s just another way of describing IT (information technology) “outsourcing”; others use it to mean any computing service provided over the Internet or a similar network; and some define it as any bought-in computer service you use that sits outside your firewall. However we define cloud computing, there’s no doubt it makes most sense when we stop talking about abstract definitions and look at some simple, real examples—so let’s do just that.

How Cloud Computing Works?

If you have experienced using e-mail, you have already experienced using the cloud. Basically, what you are loading on your PC, as an e-mail user, is simply – an application. You log in into a Web Service, and all the programs necessary to actually run the application, are located on a remote machine owned by another company. The real storage and the software does not exist on your computer, but exist instead – on the cloud.

Why Cloud?

Cloud users:
  • can access their data from anywhere, at any time (like e-mail), only with the usage of an internet connection
  • are relieving themselves from the stress of buying software licenses for each tool they need to install
  • hardware cost is brought down (data is stored and copied on the cloud)
  • need computers with less processing power (without losing on the performance)
  • save money on IT support, and on server and data storage space that usually requires high maintenance
  • can solve more complex problems easily and speedily, by using a grid of computers available on the cloud, instead of a single computer
  • can grow their business as much as they like, without experiencing failures in the system due to the large number of customers
  • Cloud services are usually paid for, as and when they are being used. Like a taxi fare. And the meter stops running as soon as you are not using the cloud any more. Whereas with regular hosting, you are paying for the server maintenance and the staff all of the time, and you are not sure that the service will always be optimal to your end users.

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